黑暗的心
Heart of Darkness

  • 作   者:

    约瑟夫·康拉德
    Joseph Conrad

  • 出版社:

    外语教学与研究出版社
    Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press

  • 语   言:

    英文

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  • 电子书:

    ¥3.90

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Originally published as a three-part serial story, in Blackwood’s Magazine, the novella Heart of Darkness has been variously published and translated into many languages. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Heart of Darkness as the sixty-seventh of the hundred best novels in English of the twentieth century.

《黑暗的心》是公认的二十世纪文学经典、剥葱皮一样把殖民主义者的心态一层层刻画得淋漓尽致。本书具有鲜明的现代主义特色。作者康拉德用了马洛这样一个叙述者,让他以回忆者的身份出现在故事里,他的叙述穿梭于过去与现在、自己和库尔兹及听众之间,让读者分享着他的各种情绪,这种叙述角度的交替,开创了一种新的叙述模式,代替了传统的线性叙述方法。

Heart of Darkness (1899) is a short novel by Polish novelist Joseph Conrad, written as a frame narrative, about Charles Marlow’s experience as an ivory transporter down the Congo River in Central Africa. The story is a complex exploration of the attitudes people hold on what constitutes a barbarian versus a civilized society and the attitudes on colonialism and racism that were part and parcel of European imperialism.

约瑟夫·康拉德(1857年12月-1924年8月),英国著名作家,因其最擅长写海洋冒险小说,有“海洋小说大师”之称。1889年开始业余小说创作。他一共写了13部长篇小说、28篇短篇小说和两篇回忆录, 其中比较著名的有长篇小说《水仙号上的黑家伙》(1897年)、《吉姆老爷、(1900年)、《诺斯特罗莫》(1904年)、《间谍》(1907年)、《机缘》(1914年)、《胜利》(1914年),中篇小说《黑暗的心》(后来被改编成电影《现代启示录》)(1902年),以及短篇小说《青春》(1906年)等。

Joseph Conrad(3 December 1857 – 3 August 1928) was a Polish author who wrote in English after settling in England.He wrote stories and novels, often with a nautical setting, that depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of an indifferent universe. He was a master prose stylist who brought a distinctly non-English sensibility into English literature.

"She came abreast of the steamer, stood still, and faced us. Her long shadow fell to the water's edge. Her face had a tragic and fierce aspect of wild sorrow and of dumb pain mingled with the fear of some struggling, half-shaped resolve. She stood looking at us without a stir and like the wilderness itself, with an air of brood-ing over an inscrutable purpose. A whole minute passed, and then she made a step forward. There was a low jingle, a glint of yellow metal, a sway of fringed draper-ies, and she stopped as if her heart had failed her. The young fellow by my side growled. The pilgrims mur-mured at my back. She looked at us all as if her life had depended upon the unswerving steadiness of her glance. Suddenly she opened her bared arms and threw them up rigid above her head, as though in an uncon-trollable desire to touch the sky, and at the same time the swift shadows darted out on the earth, swept around on the river, gathering the steamer into a shadowy em-brace. A formidable silence hung over the scene.

"She turned away slowly, walked on, following the bank, and passed into the bushes to the left. Once only her eyes gleamed back at us in the dusk of the thickets before she disappeared.

"'If she had offered to come aboard I really think I would have tried to shoot her,' said the man of patches, nervously. 'I had been risking my life every day for the last fortnight to keep her out of the house. She got in one day and kicked up a row about those miser-able rags I picked up in the storeroom to mend my clothes with. I wasn't decent. At least it must have been that, for she talked like a fury to Kurtz for an hour, point-ing at me now and then. I don't understand the dia-lect of this tribe. Luckily for me, I fancy Kurtz felt too ill that day to care, or there would have been mis-chief. I don't understand... No—it's too much for me. Ah, well, it's all over now.'

"At this moment I heard Kurtz's deep voice behind the curtain, 'Save me!—save the ivory, you mean. Don't tell me. Save ME! Why, I've had to save you. You are interrupting my plans now. Sick! Sick! Not so sick as you would like to believe. Never mind. I'll carry my ideas out yet—I will return. I'll show you what can be done. You with your little peddling no-tions—you are interfering with me. I will return. I... '

"The manager came out. He did me the honor to take me under the arm and lead me aside. 'He is very low, very low,' he said. He considered it necessary to sigh, but neglected to be consistently sorrowful. 'We have done all we could for him—haven't we? But there is no disguising the fact, Mr. Kurtz has done more harm than good to the Company. He did not see the time was not ripe for vigorous action. Cautiously, cau-tiously—that's my principle. We must be cautious yet. The district is closed to us for a time. Deplorable! Upon the whole, the trade will suffer. I don't deny there is a remarkable quantity of ivory—mostly fossil. We must save it, at all events—but look how precarious the posi-tion is—and why? Because the method is unsound.' 'Do you,' said I, looking at the shore, 'call it "unsound method"?' 'Without doubt,' he exclaimed, hotly. 'Don't you?'... 'No method at all,' I murmured after a while. 'Exactly,' he exulted. 'I anticipated this. Shows a complete want of judgment. It is my duty to point it out in the proper quarter.' 'Oh,' said I, 'that fellow—what's his name?—the brickmaker, will make a readable report for you.' He appeared con-founded for a moment. It seemed to me I had never breathed an atmosphere so vile, and I turned mentally to Kurtz for relief—positively for relief. 'Neverthe-less I think Mr. Kurtz is a remarkable man,' I said with emphasis. He started, dropped on me a cold heavy glance, said very quietly, 'He WAS,' and turned his back on me. My hour of favor was over; I found myself lumped along with Kurtz as a partisan of methods for which the time was not ripe: I was unsound! Ah! but it was something to have at least a choice of nightmares.

"I had turned to the wilderness really, not to Mr. Kurtz, who, I was ready to admit, was as good as buried. And for a moment it seemed to me as if I also were buried in a vast grave full of unspeakable secrets. I felt an intolerable weight oppressing my breast, the smell of the damp earth, the unseen presence of victorious corruption, the darkness of an impenetrable night... The Russian tapped me on the shoulder. I heard him mumbling and stammering something about 'brother seaman—couldn't conceal—knowledge of matters that would affect Mr. Kurtz's reputation.' I waited. For him evidently Mr. Kurtz was not in his grave; I suspect that for him Mr. Kurtz was one of the immortals. 'Well!' said I at last, 'speak out. As it happens, I am Mr. Kurtz's friend—in a way.'

"He stated with a good deal of formality that had we not been 'of the same profession,' he would have kept the matter to himself without regard to conse-quences. 'He suspected there was an active ill-will to-wards him on the part of these white men that—' 'You are right,' I said, remembering a certain conversa-tion I had overheard. 'The manager thinks you ought to be hanged.' He showed a concern at this intelligence which amused me at first. 'I had better get out of the way quietly,' he said, earnestly. 'I can do no more for Kurtz now, and they would soon find some excuse. What's to stop them? There's a military post three hun-dred miles from here.' 'Well, upon my word,' said I, 'perhaps you had better go if you have any friends amongst the savages near by.' 'Plenty,' he said. 'They are simple people—and I want nothing, you know.' He stood biting his lips, then: 'I don't want any harm to happen to these whites here, but of course I was think-ing of Mr. Kurtz's reputation—but you are a brother seaman and—' 'All right,' said I, after a time. 'Mr. Kurtz's reputation is safe with me.' I did not know how truly I spoke.

  • Part One

  • Part Two

  • Part Three

  • 黑暗之地,黑暗之心

    其实这本书我是因为对于黑暗小说的爱而开始接触的,但接触着,我渐渐体会到了对于整个社会的一种映射和对于黑暗环境的无奈和绝望。本文主要叙述者Marlow在昏暗与明亮交织的泰晤士河上的一艘巡逻小艇上讲述了一段如同泰晤士河般夹杂着光明和黑暗的故事。有关kurtz这个角色其实作者并没有直接描述,而是先通过Marlow和……展开↓

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